Category: Evaluating social innovation

Evaluating social innovation

It also refers to improving on an existing concept or idea using a step-wise process to create a commercially viable product. Innovation is stereotypically viewed to be the wheelhouse of small and start-up companies since they tend to be very dynamic, but as we shall see, it is also a vital and viable aspect in big companies.

The most fulfilling thing about an innovation is being able to actualize an idea into a successful concept. To do this, you need to go through a long and complex process. For you to succeed you must understand the process well and must have the support needed; this is what differentiates a successful innovation process from an unsuccessful innovation process.

As a businessman, how does innovation relate to you? Do all businesses need to be innovative? Is there a process that is followed to come up with an innovation? It is very understandable for you to ask yourself these questions. To help you understand the mt5 mac catalina process, I will inform you why you need innovationexplain the risks associated with it, give a detailed procedure of the processlook at some models of innovation and then give you tips on how to carry out a successful innovation process.

Innovation is a process of improving a product service from its current state. Already from the definition, you can tell that innovation is not limited to the size of business or the business venture you are dealing with. Hence, innovation is open for everyone in business.

evaluating social innovation

Innovation adds value to the services or goods that you provide and so you should seek to be innovative in your business. Let me show you some more advantages of embracing innovation in your business. The innovation process is lauded for its many benefits that have defined the corporate and social cultural scene since the era of industrialization. However, it does not lack its set of challenges and risk as discussed below.

Innovative companies have the advantage of experience in innovating a product.

evaluating social innovation

Since they understand the process so well, they do not have to always go through many trial and errors. The fact that they have repeated the process several times sets them apart from other companies who do not have an innovative culture.

Innovative companies attract innovative employees. Since the company maintains an innovative culture, the employees understand that they are responsible for innovations and implementation of new products. Moreover, every stage of the innovation process is characterized by a large number of experienced personnel who ensure that the process goes on smoothly.These pioneers are catalyzing change where the paths are unchartered and the solutions have not yet been invented — they are pursuing social innovation.

This is a powerful trend. At the same time, social change funders and actors are taking on increased accountability for results. They care about measuring inputs, outcomes and ultimately impact.

This is also a powerful trend. However, when these two trends come together complex problem solving and a thirst for monitoring and evaluation they often result in a toxic environment that stifles innovation.

Why is that? Imagine the following scenario. You have decided to tackle youth unemployment in your hometown. It is hard to tell what success will look like; maybe getting the right actors to agree to work together systematically is already a big win?

Great news: a foundation is willing to fund your efforts, but with the following stipulations. You need to achieve impact within exactly 24 months. Exactly 12 months in, you need to demonstrate mid-point progress toward those pre-defined outcomes. The foundation wants your efforts to look like this linear and predictable and will evaluate you accordingly:.

The mid-point evaluation of this effort would show that hardly any progress had been made and might conclude that your effort had failed and should not receive further funding. However, rather than assessing exactly how far the effort is on achieving pre-maturely defined outcomes, more interesting inquiry includes:.

It does not provide a point in time snapshot of the exact outcomes achieved, but rather, it does justice to the unpredictable and creative ways social innovation unfolds and allows funders and actors to learn, adapt, challenge their assumptions, make decisions and improve their strategies real-time.

If you are funding or implementing solutions that follow the pattern depicted in Figure 2 above, then Developmental Evaluation might just be for you!

Your email address will not be published. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. Member Area. However, rather than assessing exactly how far the effort is on achieving pre-maturely defined outcomes, more interesting inquiry includes: Can we discern the critical junctures and factors that have resulted in the spikes and troughs?Stay in the know about the latest GIA projects, awards, conferences and more by signing up for Aging Matters.

Receive benefits including members-only contacts and resources, conference discounts, programs and events, staff services and news updates on aging and philanthropy. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy. A national membership organization of philanthropies: a network, resource, and champion amplifying the voices of older people and issues of aging. Share this: Print. Report: Evaluating Social Innovation A Call to Action for the Philanthropic Sector: The philanthropic sector has been experimenting with innovative grantmaking in the hopes of triggering significant and sustainable change.

FSG is a nonprofit consulting firm specializing in strategy, evaluation, and research founded in as Foundation Strategy Group. View resource. Date of Publication:.

Donate to GIA. Become a GIA Member Receive benefits including members-only contacts and resources, conference discounts, programs and events, staff services and news updates on aging and philanthropy. Visit us on Social Media.ASL partners have been implementing pilot actions, aimed at achieving social transformation in their territories, throughout a continuous process of social innovation where it is important to observe if social changes occur.

The impact assessment of the pilot actions was made using the Theory of Change and Contribution Analysis, which represents a cause-effect chain between activities and outcomes.

The diagrams resulted from the partners mapping their territorial needs to establish the social problem and planning the implementation of the pilot actions. Each diagram consists of a set of activities and outputs defined by the promotors. The activities are supposed to generate immediate, intermediate and long-term results. For each, outcome indicators are defined to measure and determine the actual impact. The implementation of a pilot action of social innovation will always have to take into account three factors: context and external influences, assumptions, and risks.

You can draw your own Theory of Change Diagram. Create Diagram.Developing successful cradle to career pathways for families and children in low-income urban communities, including: access to education and jobs, healthy and safe communities, transportation, and affordable housing. Identifying new organizational forms, financing models, public-private collaborations, and technologies that can improve social outcomes across an array of policy areas.

Developing new methods for evaluating social innovation models, that account for risk and allow for successes and failures to be evaluated in trusted frameworks. The Price Center for Social Innovation engages in a number of long-term initiatives that advance our work in social innovation. The Price Center for Social Innovation is proud to offer unique educational programs in social innovation, including: a graduate certificate in social innovation, a new executive education program for practitioners working in social impact organizations, and a wide range of student programs that provide hands-on learning opportunities outside the classroom.

The USC Price Center for Social Innovation develops ideas and illuminates strategies to improve the quality of life for people in low-income, urban communities. Highlights div. A Blueprint for Rental Market Stabilization. Tue, July 28 am - am. Our Research Pathways to Opportunity Developing successful cradle to career pathways for families and children in low-income urban communities, including: access to education and jobs, healthy and safe communities, transportation, and affordable housing.

New Models to Deliver Social Impact Identifying new organizational forms, financing models, public-private collaborations, and technologies that can improve social outcomes across an array of policy areas.

Evaluating Social Innovation

Evaluation Frameworks Developing new methods for evaluating social innovation models, that account for risk and allow for successes and failures to be evaluated in trusted frameworks.

Special Initiatives.All over the world, community mutual aid groups are forming in the absence of institutional actors. Supply chains are adapting and familiar brands like BurberryDyson and Teslar are reacting swiftly to produce much needed medical equipment. Some countries like Ethiopia are opening the financial sector to enable more mobile money.

Arts, culture, education, sports and leisure services are fast adapting to provide online services. Our charities, social enterprises and social services are also feeling the imperative for innovation. Reduction in income streams from funders delaying or withdrawing, from household cutbacks and from an immediate halt from subsidiary income streams like room rental or paid services mean many will move into survival mode.

This comes at a time when demand for their services will be greater than ever. The challenge facing the social sector is to create more positive impact with less investment. It is a time to embrace flexibility and to allow for new learning. Institutional donors are being asked to permit changes in contract deliverables, timelines and reporting. Emergency funding should hinge on trust and regular communication. It is tempting to assume that impact reporting can also be moved to the backburner.

However, impact management is just if not more important during periods of innovation than established delivery. Quick and timely feedback will be critical to ensure emerging social needs are being met. Similarly, funders will be making difficult decisions during this time about effectiveness. They will be looking across their portfolios and asking which services provide essential impact. The good news is that impact reporting can be nimble and combined with innovation to make sure we do not end up adrift during this period.

I have pulled five key tips from the two approaches to bake into any COVID19 adaptations to social services:. During periods of innovation you want to be collecting less impact data, more frequently. This means your reporting period could be a week — it could even be a day.

You should collect short-term feedback and quickly analyse and consolidate the learnings. The diagram below illustrates how the action learning cycle, which might take a year or more for an established programme, should be sped up for rapid feedback during the innovation phase.

As your project matures with more consistent features, the length of time for a typical review period and the sophistication of evaluation methods should both increase.

Evaluating Social Innovation

The data you will be collecting needs to be easy to manage. I would advise focussing on a small number of open-ended questions. These should gather feedback on change outcomes and why or how those changes are happening. Try to sketch up a rapid Theory of Change to guide your questions and return to this as you gather data. Prepare outcome questions on a few focal areas, then cycle between these with different stakeholders.

This way you reduce the burden of questions on each stakeholder or interaction. It is worth noting that lighter data collection does not mean you can go light on rigour. Consider bias in terms of your sample and question structure. MSC invites the collection of stories to understand what is changing and why it matters. This matters to avoid feedback becoming soundbites.

You can create mini case-studies to preserve context. You might cover the background of the interviewee, what happened for them and the difference it has made. Physical distancing during the coronavirus lockdowns means speaking to stakeholders face-to-face should be minimised.

This is not a reason to avoid collecting data. Service users may even be more receptive than ever to forming a contact and more inclined to provide feedback. Collect phone numbers or provide videoconference invites to connect remotely with users to conduct short interviews or surveys. Remember to take time to establish a connection and build trust before diving into feedback as this can sometimes be a little harder over the phone.The front edge of the philanthropic sector has spent the last decade experimenting with innovative grantmaking in the hopes of triggering significant and sustainable change.

In many cases, traditional evaluation approaches fail to meet the fast-paced information needs of philanthropic decision makers and innovators in the midst of complex social change efforts. At worst, the application of traditional evaluation approaches to innovative change initiatives may even decrease the likelihood of success because they restrict implementers to pre-set plans that lose their relevance as the initiative unfolds.

evaluating social innovation

In this paper, we explore ways that common evaluation approaches and practices constrain innovation and offer lessons about an emerging evaluation approach—developmental evaluation—which supports the adaptation that. For what kinds of grantmaking strategies should funders consider using developmental evaluation?

What organizational conditions are necessary for it to work? How can grantmakers grapple with the challenging questions that developmental evaluation raises about innovation, accountability, rigor, and adaptation? Drawing on the reflections and insights of foundation staff and evaluators who have experimented with developmental evaluation, we call on philanthropy to re-envision the role, purpose, and processes of evaluation so that social innovations have a better chance of success.

Your email address will not be published. In this paper, we explore ways that common evaluation approaches and practices constrain innovation and offer lessons about an emerging evaluation approach—developmental evaluation—which supports the adaptation that is so crucial to innovation. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Connect with:.

An Empirical Analysis of the Role of Social Innovation in Response to an Economic Recession

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